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Lamborghini tweaks Huracan coupe, convertible

Spyder introduction for 2016 means updates for closed-cabin model

Published: November 8, 2015, 4:00 AM
Updated: April 29, 2018, 1:30 PM

Lamborghini Huracan LP 610-4 - The Huracan Spider only has 610 hp and takes slightly more than 10 seconds to accelerate from zero-to-200 km/h. Good luck explaining that to the police at the side of the road when it arrives in Canada next year.

Lamborghini updates its cars once a decade or so and hardly ever offers a second generation of a model. So, it’s kind of noteworthy when it updates a model, as the company is doing with the Huracán.

Lamborghini Huracán - We’re halfway through our list and we can imagine there are readers kvetching about the dearth of exotic supercars. This one’s for them, knowing that some Canadian millionaires will stray from the script and walk into a hyper-expensive import dealership to kick some pricey Pirellis. Lamborghini’s starter car, the Huracán, is the Italian sportscar maker’s latest wedgy doorstop. Stuffed behind the jetfighter-like cockpit is a 602-horsepower V-10 engine tied to a seven-speed dual-clutch automated transmission (there’s no manual gearbox available) and all-wheel drive. With its copious power directed to all four fat tires, this Lambo can leap to 97 km/h in less than three seconds.

The Huracán LP 610-4 was introduced in 2014 to replace Gallardo, and the convertible version (Spyder) was recently unveiled prior to being shipped to buyers early in 2016. The engine for the Spyder is an updated version of the 5.2-litre V10 in the coupe, and so the coupe also gets the update.

The update comes in the form of cylinder deactivation (in preparation for stricter incoming emissions regulations for Europe), which is a first for a naturally aspirated production V10. Under light throttle conditions, a bank of cylinders (5) is deactivated but when the throttle is applied, the five cylinders kick back up in a totally seamless action. The process helps reduce CO2 emissions and fuel consumption.

The other big change is in drivability, with improvements to the electronically controlled all-wheel drive system, especially in the way it interacts with the different driving modes (Strada, Sport, and Corsa) and in particular with the more-docile Strada mode.

There are some interior cosmetic changes, with leather added to the top of the console and the door pulls, air vents painted matte black, an additional lighter socket, cupholders and cruise control, among others. An optional 390 watt Sensonum audio system adds 10 speakers to the mix of interior upgrades. The personalization program Lamborghini Ad Personam, further adds the availability of exterior heritage colours and matte accents.

And just for show, you can also opt for the transparent engine cover and add LED lighting to highlight the V10, and high-gloss black tailpipes for the optional sports exhaust system.